Foggy Night in Paris | Brassai Lighted Picture
Foggy Night in Paris | Brassai Lighted Picture
Foggy Night in Paris | Brassai Lighted Picture
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Foggy Night in Paris | Brassai Lighted Picture

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avenue de l'Observatoire, Paris, 1934

Size: 24"x36"

A vintage auto treks up a misty road leading to a French Observatory in this pre-WW II classic Paris art print captured by Brassai in 1934. A beautiful companion piece to . Bright Mini Light Bulbs in Truck headlights. Four dim lights accent park lanterns in background.

Capturing Paris: the City of Light.

Brassaï (1899-1984) was a famous 19th Century Photographer who lived in Paris between the first and second world wars. Originally born Gyula Halász, he later acquired the pseudonym Brassaï after his Hungarian hometown Brassó and made an international name for himself with books such as Paris de nuit (Paris After Dark) (1933) and Voluptés de Paris (Pleasures of Paris) (1935), in which he captured both the seedier sides of the French capital and its high society. “There are many similarities between what we call the 'underworld' and the 'fashionable world,” he said. Picking up his now famous nickname ‘the Eye of Paris’ Brassai made it his life's work to capture the Parisian nightlife of the 1930s. He would go on to publish a book "Paris at Night" to historically record his images which is now considered a modern classic. While he often shot the underbelly of Paris he also documented the French ballet and the Grand Operas as well. Indeed his friends at the time included intellectuals and other well known art figures such as Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Henri Matisse.

On one outing Brassai found himself on a winding road leading up to the Paris Observatory. There was thick tule fog in the air which made it difficult to see. As a vintage truck drove past a park Brassai captured his famous image entitled "avenue de l'Observatoire, Paris". The year was 1934. At Electric Art we use this classic fine art print as a backdrop and then add miniature incandescent lamps to bring the scene to life as a light up art picture. Move your mouse over the image above to see the lights turn ON. Or, if you're on a phone just touch the image.